Your EDUCATION may be ‘FAILING’ you because…

Life Doesn't happen in exam rooms (2)

[Flashback] High school/ University Exam Period, late night study sessions preparing for your future, where you have that Tim Tams opened, messy hair and severe eyes bags.

[Now picture this] Full Time work. Bills, Groceries and Rent and those special window-faced envelopes that haven’t been touched for precarious reasons. You look at the date and you realized that Christmas is round the corner, not only do you need to think about presents for your loved ones but for those long lost relatives that we have to see at Christmas parties as well as wear those festive Christmas jumpers.

 

Check Bank Account to pre purchase flights for your best friend’s wedding. A thought popped into your head, ‘Did I even get paid? Where did all that money go?’

 

Richard Branson writes

Are young people being educated not to think?

 

RB future of education

In my editorial from the first Student magazine, I highlighted the need for real debate about outdated education models. “The fierce debates on education, surely involving the student more than anyone, are almost never thrown open to him. We plan to be a vehicle for intelligent comment and protest.”

RB future of education2.jpg

 

 

 

Student magazine fulfilled this aim, with lots of articles and discussion around education issues throughout its lifespan. We ran a humorous account of Alias Lamego’s experiences of education called ‘College Loaf’. More seriously, we ran an article called ‘Education Axed’ by Gavin Maxwell, the acclaimed author of Ring of Bright Water, who was a big influence on my own development.

“Man is a rational animal, whose opinions and ideas can be arrived at by rational processes of thought…” it began. “I contend that this claim could not be upheld, and that all civilised races of making are so thoroughly indoctrinated by their education as to render their intellects functionless. Each individual has to a greater or lesser degree, been brain-washed, although we prefer to use the word ‘educated’, and so have all nations at all times.”

 

RB future of education3

 

Gavin went on to question how teachers are often tasked with showing pupils how to learn facts, rather than truly use their brains and come up with new ideas. “The strictly scholastic side of a child’s education…consist in the main, of the ingesting of a vast mass of largely useless and uninteresting facts for dyspeptic regurgitation in subsequent exams.”

 

RB future of education4

 

 

He also ponders, back in 1967, how technology could already be holding back real education. “So, here is our educated man, living in an essentially technological world which actually contributes to the submissive, non-thinking condition upon which his whole education has been based. The higher the technology, the further the regression into the nursery world of toys and dreams of power.”

RB future of education5

 

While I think that technology has a huge role to play in improving education and engaging young people in learning, Gavin’s points about the education system’s obsession with stats and exams ring true. There should be far more focus on practical education and the development of skills to use used in everyday activities and business. Life doesn’t happen in exam rooms.

 

 

RB future of education6

 

 

 

Gavin Maxwell concludes: “The older generation is guilty – then and now – of educating its children not to think.”

 

Wealth Plus Lending supports your personal growth. To  continually learn more follow us on

follow me on facebook

follow me on google plus

I was earning $500,000 a year at 30: Here are the 10 best pieces of advice I can give you about money

 by Cary Carbonaro, Business Insider Contributor Nov. 17, 2015

businesspeople london bankersFlickr / Herry Lawford

After graduating from college, my career moved quickly up the corporate ladder, including eight years on Wall Street.

I worked at JPMorgan Chase, I was a vice president at Citibank, and then a director at Lord Abbett Investments on the e-marketing and e-commerce side.

Every day a new company was going public, and I lived across the street from the New York Stock Exchange.

Every night before a business day, I would hear them setting up some crazy paraphernalia in the Street. There were giveaways on the Street because there was so much “silly” money. Anything with a dot-com got funded or went public.

For example, Pets.com was launched in 1998. In case you don’t know the story, the Pets.compeople spent half of the value of their company on a Super Bowl ad and by 2000 the company was defunct.

I was earning $500,000 a year at age 30, but I felt like I wasn’t making much money because I was in an established industry without big stock options. It was conservative and I was conservative. It didn’t fulfill me. I felt like I wasn’t making a good difference in anyone’s life.

Cary Carbonaro headshot

Courtesy of Cary Carbonaro

So I quit that job, moved to Central Florida and started my own financial advisory business. Everyone thought I was crazy. Who walks away from an amazing job like the one I had?

I had to reinvent myself as an entrepreneur. It took me a long time to build my firm, one client at a time, from scratch. I went from $500,000 income a year to almost zero the next. It challenged me personally, professionally and emotionally.

The beautiful side of the hard work is that I have a much better sense of my purpose in the world. I love being a practicing certified financial planner because it equips me to make a difference in my clients’ lives. I get to help them make all the right moves with money. It is rewarding to watch them achieve the goals we set out together, and I even wrote a book so I could reach a wider range of the population, from the young to the seniors who might not be able to afford a certified financial planner.

Now here are some of the best pieces of advice I can give you about money.

View As: One Page Slides


1. Beware of FREE money

Credit cards are NOT free money. Use them as you would cash, or don’t use them at all. If you use them to stopgap your life, you will never have financial freedom.

Flickr / Alan Levine

2. Simplify budgeting

It’s simple. Know what you have coming in and going out each month. Do you know this? It doesn’t matter if you do it on a napkin or Mint or an app on your phone. This is so simple, yet so important. It is the building block of all financial planning.

3. Know your worth

Assets (what you own) minus liabilities (what you owe) equal net worth. And your net worth does NOT equal your self-worth.

Always remember that.

Thomas Lohnes / Stringer / Getty Images

4. Don’t be afraid

Personal finance is not just about math, and you don’t have to be good at math to learn it. Simplify, learn the basics, and just get started. It is never too late to learn.

The first step is knowledge. You can’t fix what you don’t know. Learning financial literacy is one piece of education that will be well worth your time.

5. Know your credit score

This is important for your entire adult life, and having a good or excellent score can save you hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Flickr / Mads Bødker

6. Teach your family about money

Financial literacy is a life lesson that should be passed down to your children. Learn it, share it, and your entire family will be better off.

7. Inflation hurts

You have to invest to outpace inflation and get growth on your money — otherwise you’re effectively losing money as time goes by. This means don’t hoard cash, and invest for the long term, which is greater than 10 years.

8. Never lie

Don’t lie about money or spending with your partner. Full financial disclosure is a key to a healthy relationship.

9. Plan for your future

Planning for your financial future is way more important than planning for vacations, parties, etc. Are you spending enough time on your financial future? This is a strategic conversation and you might need to hire a professional financial planner.

10. Just start

There are multitudes of free resources to learn the basics, and you can hire a certified financial planner when your situation gets more complex. Find a planner who suits your needs atLetsMakeAPlan.org.

Cary Carbonaro, MBA, CFP, is a managing director of United Capital of New York and New Jersey. See more about Cary and her bestselling book “The Money Queen’s Guide for Women Who Want to Build Wealth and Banish Fear” at MoneyQueenGuide.com.

How To Pay Off Debt Fast Using The Stack Method MONEY

BY CRAIG DEWE

Just cause you can buy it doesnt mean you should.

Whether it’s consumer debt on credit cards, student loans or a mortgage, most people find themselves weighed down by debt at some point in their lives. This can keep us working jobs we hate just to pay the bills and keep our heads above water. By learning how to pay off debt fast you can release this burden and remove some of the stress from your life.

Today I’m going to show you how to pay off your debt as fast as possibleusing the Stack Method.

Step 1: Stop Creating New Debt

Most people do not receive training in handling money and how to live within their means. If you’re in debt then you’re probably one of these people and it’s time to bite the reality bullet. It’s going to be impossible to get out of debt unless you retrain your financial habits right now.

You must make a stand against all the marketers trying to take your hard earned money or offering easy finance. You don’t need more stuff to make you happy. What you need is financial peace of mind.

So cut up your credit cards or freeze them. I mean this literally. Put them in a container of water and stash them in your freezer. Then when there’s an opportunity to spend, you have time to thaw out (you and the credit cards) and really decide if you need that purchase.

Step 2: Rank Your Debt By Interest Rate

Make a list of all your debt with amounts and the interest rate. The highest interest rate should be at the top as this is what you’ll pay off first. Paying off your high interest debt is the key to the Stack Method and paying off debt as fast as possible.

Interest is a powerful weapon and right now the bank or other financial institutions are using it against you. Interest significantly increases the amount you need to pay back and often we’re completely unaware of how much that is.

For example, if you have a $10,000 credit card debt at 20% interest where you pay a minimum payment of $200 a month, you will end up taking 9 years and 8 months to pay off the actual amount of $21,680 including $11,680 in interest!

Step 3: Lower Your Interest Rates

You can often lower your credit card interest rates by doing a balance transfer. This means moving your credit card to another bank and they will lower the interest rate to get your business. Shop around and try to get the lowest interest rate for the longest duration (preferably until it’s paid off completely).

Just make sure you’re reading the terms and conditions carefully so you don’t get stung by the new bank in other ways. Once you’ve done this you can order your list of debt again if things have changed.

Step 4: Create a Strategic Spending Plan

This is where we improve on your financial control from Step 1. Take a piece of paper and write down your income after tax and all the expenses that you have. This will include the minimum payments on all your debt.

Look at your expenses and then rank them in order of importance to you. Look at the items on the bottom of your list and decide whether you’d rather have them or be financially stable. The objective is to create a Strategic Spending Plan where your expenses are lower than your income.

You also decide how much you are willing to spend on each area of your life. You can allocate amounts for rent, groceries, eating out, buying clothes and other activities however realize that once you’ve spent your allocated money there’s no dipping into other areas. It also helps to have a Fun Account that you can spend on what you like and an Emergencies Account in case your car breaks down etc.

You also want to include in your Strategic Spending Plan as extra amount you’re going to use to pay off debt. Can you afford $20 a week? $50? $100? $200 or more? It’s important that you get a realistic number that you can commit to each week without fail and this is your Stack Repayment.

Step 5: Create a Repayment Schedule

The first part of the Stack Method is to cover the minimum payment on every single debt you have. Any time you miss a payment, you incur fees and these add up quickly. This also includes making the minimum payment on the debt with the highest interest rate.

Then for the debt with the highest interest rate (your Target Debt) you’re going to add the Stack Repayment from your Strategic Spending Plan. You apply this Stack Repayment and the minimum payment until that debt is paid off in full.

As your official minimum payment decreases you add that extra amount to your Stack Repayment. So as your minimum repayment drops your Stack Repayment increases equally. This will compound how fast you pay off the Target Debt by adding even more to the repayments you’re making.

Step 6: Reward Your Progress

You want to track your Target Debt so you can see your progress along the way. You can also decide on milestones that you’re going to celebrate and reward yourself on. A reward doesn’t have to cost money but if it does then it comes from your previously allocated Strategic Spending Plan.

This is an important step as it will keep your motivation going when you feel your willpower fading. Just like you’ve trained yourself to brush your teeth and shower, you can train yourself to manage your money. Feel great that you’re now entering the 10-,20% of people who are actually responsible with money.

Step 7: Compound Your Results

Once you pay off your Target Debt you have a huge celebration and congratulate yourself. Then you move the Stack Repayment (which includes the previous minimum payment as well now) to the next debt with the highest interest rate. This becomes the new Target Debt and you are using your Stack Repayment amount plus the minimum payment for the new debt.

This is why the Stack Method is so powerful. As you decrease a debt you actually increase your Stack Repayment amount. This means the second debt will get paid off even faster, the third even faster than that, and so on and so on until you are completely debt free.

Step 8: Be Kind To Yourself

During this process your resolve is going to be tested multiple times. Maybe you’ll have an emergency like your car breaking down or the need to travel for a sick relative. The important thing is to not throw up your hands in despair while going back to your old habits.

Life will test your commitment to your new responsible money attitude and it’s up to you how you respond. When things go wrong (and I guarantee they will) you need to shrug it off and get back on track. Show compassion when you accidentally go over your Strategic Spending Plan and decide to do better next week.

Now You Know How To Pay Off Debt Fast…

The Stack Method is a powerful tool but it’s up to you whether you use it. If you really want results then print out this article immediately and start working through the steps. It’s only by the decision you make right now that you will enjoy a debt free future and live a financially responsible life.